PJ BLOGGER

Weekly Math Comic

In Uncategorized on August 11, 2008 at 10:44 am

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  1. I know nobody here reads Laurie Goodman’s blog, but some comments she wrote in a July 27 post really show how clueless she is. Addressing NJ’s recent admission that state standards were notoriously low, Laurie had this to say –

    “So…I have several thoughts about this. The first one is surprise that a score of 33% on any test could be described as "proficient" in that subject.

    It's frustrating for parents and community members (and this BOE member) to learn about the low cut-offs, and I have to say it does seem to be a good move to raise the cutoffs. Honestly, does it seem crazy to expect "proficient" to mean 50% or more? Not to me. I think it will help us have a much more realistic picture of how our students are doing, how well they are actually learning.”

    She is only now learning about this?? The math moms knew this more than a year ago. Also, it looks like Laurie is on the Maskin and Lois bandwagon. In a letter to the editor in the March 7 RN, M&L wrote

    “These state tests are designed for assessment of federal funding NOT as a general barometer of our district’s progress. Content measurement in these tests is based on low state standards and students are only required to answer 50% of the questions correctly to be rated as “proficient”.

    It is troubling that our district so heavily relies on touting scores from state tests that aspire to the bottom. We believe that in Ridgewood we set our aims much higher than simply reaching towards proficiency on state tests.

    State test scores are hardly the benchmark we should look to while measuring student performance. It is a disservice to the children and to our teachers. We must aim higher – this is Ridgewood.”

    Will Laurie express this same level of frustration when, and if, she discovers that Ridgewood’s NJASK percent advanced proficient scores showed trends that were among the worst in the state?

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