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Archive for June, 2008|Monthly archive page

Now here’s the rub.

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2008 at 7:50 pm

It is great to hear that “math was never a problem” wit your kids (sic).

My children never had a problem either, except for the fact that it was too easy.

So, one ended up accelerated and the other double accelerated in middle school.

Now here’s the rub. My double accelerated student is taking an algebra class over the summer to catch up to where he is supposed to be for high school algebra 2 in the fall.

You ask, how can that be, he was double accelerated and had algebra in 7th grade already. Why is he being tutored when he got an A for the class and just received an A for 8th grade Geometry?

Fortunately, his 8th grade geometry teacher recognized that his accelerated students lacked the adequate level of proficiency in algebra to go on to algebra 2 in high school. So, he took it upon himself to tutor them over the summer.

How did this happen? Didn’t these children have Ms. Debra Ives, former head of the math curriculum in Ridgewood, as their algebra teacher in 7th grade?

Why yes, they did. And Ms. Ives is no longer employed by the district. Her tenure was very brief, just over a year in Ridgewood.

This just proves that our administrators are very weak in teaching skills and judging curriculum.

Ms. Ives did not leave because of displeasure at Cottage Place. No, she left because she had alienated parents and principals alike. In fact, she was a product of the Montclair State Education cabal that rules our district and was hired by Regina Botsford.

So, my dear Miss 12:11pm, I am not “just the perpetually angry at Board of Ed” person. I am a real parent with real life experiences with the math education curriculum in this district. And you my dear may flack all you like for the BOE and their administrators but it doesn’t change the fact that things are out of whack here in Ridgewood’s education system. No amount of jaw boning or name calling is going to stop the parents, who know they are right, from demanding excellence and accountability. It is our civic responsibility.

Bunny Shop

‘The Record’ of Hackensack to Vacate Main Offices, Head ‘West’

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2008 at 7:19 pm

By Joe Strupp

Published: June 30, 2008 10:50 AM ET

NEW YORK The Record of Hackensack, N.J. is planning to vacate its main headquarters and move staff to the site of its sister daily, The Herald News of West Paterson, according to a staff memo from Publisher Stephen A. Borg. The memo declared: “We must re-invent ourselves.”

The memo stated that the move could save about $2.4 million per year. Borg confirmed the memo and said that most of the news staff would actually become mobile journalists, working from the field, while others would also relocate to one of the paper’s eight weekly newspaper sites.

“The number one objective is more mobile journalism,” Borg, who said the paper has about 30 such “mojos,” who report from laptops and cell phones, told E&P. “And to take advantage of our other offices.”

Borg said the move has not been scheduled, but added, “I wouldn’t want it to occur any later than January ’09. Advertising has already moved. In the last six weeks.”

The memo refers to Record relocating to Garret Mountain Plaza, an office building in West Paterson that houses several operations for parent company North Jersey Media Group, including the Herald News. Borg said The Record would occupy some of that leased space. “We are working on the logistics,” he said. “But reporters I want out in the field, the vast majority of them.”

The memo, distributed last week, states: “We are in the midst of great change. Classified advertising revenues are falling fast. Some of it is due to the economy. But much of it is secular. Ads won’t return to the print newspapers even when the economy gets better.”

Later, the memo reveals, “Vacating Hackensack will save the company $2.4 million a year. This number is for electricity, cleaning crews, and other items that will go away upon vacancy. When we actually sell the land, additional money will be saved like, but not limited to, property taxes.

“So, we will be vacating Hackensack as soon as logistically possible. Some of Record editorial will be moving to Garret Mountain, but I really view this change as ‘moving out to the field.’ The move is not from one big office to another. The move is from one big office to the field. It is not that The Record has left Hackensack; we are now all over the market. (I am planning a marketing campaign to promote this. I envision the “MOJOS” like a swarm of bees landing in different towns.)”

Borg’s memo then goes on to describe the ongoing shift to mobile journalists, who can work full-time out of the office: “We have and will continue to have more mobile journalists. They will share desks as they are rarely in the office. The office/work concept is called ‘hoteling’. Employees actually reserve desk time to cut down on the number of desks and square footage needed.”

The full memo is posted below:

********************************

We are in the midst of great change. Classified advertising revenues are falling fast. Some of it is due to the economy. But much of it is
secular. Ads won’t return to the print newspapers even when the economy gets better.

Getting this revenue back on the web dollar for dollar won’t happen. We are competing against non-news site for eyeballs, hence, ad dollars. Our competition is not merely other newspaper sites. Even for the ads we get, the web rates are much lower than those of print ads.

We must reinvent ourselves.

One such way is to lower our overhead costs. These are expenses that don’t directly affect our products. Reporters directly affect the product; our building does not.

Vacating Hackensack will save the company $2.4 million a year. This number is for electricity, cleaning crews, and other items that will go away upon
vacancy. When we actually sell the land, additional money will be saved like, but not limited to, property taxes.

So, we will be vacating Hackensack as soon as logistically possible. Some of Record editorial will be moving to Garret Mountain, but I really view this change as “moving out to the field”. The move is not from one big office to another. The move is from one big office to the field. It is not that The Record has left Hackensack; we are now all over the market. (I am planning a marketing campaign to promote this. I envision the “MOJOS” like a swarm of bees landing in different towns.)

We have and will continue to have more mobile journalists. They will share desks as they are rarely in the office. The office/work concept is called “hoteling”. Employees actually reserve desk time to cut down on the number of desks and square footage needed.

Bob Klapisch and Ian O’Connor Æ and there may be others Æ don’t even have desks here so this effort need not be limited to “MOJOS”. We seek more and more of this. If you are interested in this idea even if you are not a “MOJO”, please let Doug Clancy know.

Second, we are going to look at shift work closely. If two people do not overlap, they might be able to share a desk. We have executives who share offices in Garret Mountain.

Third, we plan on using our community newspaper remote offices for any NJMG purpose. We have started this, but we will do more. We have offices in the following locations:

Ridgewood, Westwood, Cresskill, Rutherford, Clifton, Rockaway, Kinnelon, and Fair Lawn.

Also, we have offices out of The Record’s circulation area Æ Millburn, Montclair and Nutley but they may be near your home.

We are analyzing the capacity of these locations right now.

If you are interested in working in one of these offices (including the Essex locations), please let Doug Clancy know.

Finally, see [Assistant Managing Editor] Doug Clancy if you are interested in working from home, even just for some of the days of your schedule (he will need the specifics).

As for the timing, there are too many open items for me to give you a precise date. There are too many items still outstanding. I don’t want it
to be past January, 09.

I encourage you to talk to people in Advertising. Overall, they have seen the move to GMP as a positive change. The builder is newer. There is more natural light. Views are nice. The furniture is newer.

While we face many challenges, innovative ideas will lead us through it. Let’s abandon the traditional work/office environment model and innovate.

Thx.

——————————————————————————–
Joe Strupp (jstrupp@editorandpublisher.com) is a senior editor at E&P.

So 5:14, now that you’ve got the whole shebang, what’s your take on this ‘mishegas’?

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2008 at 1:17 pm

For 5:14’s benefit, the prologue…

Initial comment was:
______________________

I voted for Ms. Maskin and Mr. Lois during the last BOE election, in part because I believed they would be far more responsive (if not always perfectly amenable) to the concerns of parents and taxpayers than Ms. Brogan and the other incumbent BOE trustees have been.

Obviously, my candidates were defeated by the incumbent, Ms. Brogan, and the other non-incumbent, Ms. Goodman.

Based on the collected body of public statements attributed to Ms. Goodman prior to the election, I concluded that she would not be the “change agent” I was seeking. Because I believed that Ms. Maskin and Mr. Lois would, I invested considerable positive mental energy and last-minute finger-crossing into their respective candidacies. Obviously, I was disappointed with the outcome.

But I am still convinced we need “change agents” on the BOE.

Can anybody offer a specific personal opinion, positive or negative, of Ms. Goodman’s activities on the BOE since she was installed as a trustee? Do you see any signs that she has or will develop an appetite for change, or do you believe she will be more likely to gravitate toward the status quo?
4:27 PM
___________________

The snappy comeback was:
___________________

4:27 PM

get a life. Laurie has a web site set up for communications. Why is it that you can write on this blog but not communicate with her via her web site?

Election losers don’t know when to quit.

7:29 PM__________________

Which leads you to the comment (response to 7:29) at the top of this blog string.

So 5:14, now that you’ve got the whole shebang, what’s your take on this ‘mishegas’?

1-800-FLOWERS.COM

Society News : Caroline Haugen, Quentin Wiest III

In Uncategorized on June 30, 2008 at 12:17 am

Caroline Mathea Haugen and Quentin William Wiest III were married on Saturday, June 28 at the Chapel of the Little Chief at Camp Lake Hubert in Lake Hubert, Minn. The Rev. Joan A. Gunderman, a Lutheran minister, performed the ceremony.

The bride and the bridegroom met at Kenyon College, from which they graduated.

The bride, 27, is a special education teacher at Public School 226 in New York. She received a master’s degree in early childhood special education from New York University.

She is the daughter of Barbara Richards Haugen and Gary J. Haugen of Edina, Minn. Her father is a partner in the Minneapolis law firm Maslon, Edelman, Borman & Brand. Her mother is on the board of Harpeth Hall, a private girls’ school in Nashville.

Mr. Wiest, 28, is a summer associate at the Manhattan law firm Sherman & Sterling; he specializes in bankruptcy, finance and property laws. In September, he will enter his final year of a joint M.B.A./J.D. program at Rutgers.

He is the son of Betty Wiest and Mr. Wiest II of Ridgewood, N.J. His mother is the deputy mayor of the Village of Ridgewood and the president of Ridgewood Rotary. His father is a senior project manager at Neglia Engineering Associates in Lyndhurst, N.J.

Knetgolf.com

So according to 7:29, the answer is simple. I should simply ‘quit’.

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2008 at 7:20 pm

Dear 7:29-

Not necessarily requiring your sage guidance in advance, I had long since left a comment and request for information on Ms. Goodman’s website.

“get a life”…really now. What makes you think I have no life–that I remain serious about an issue after the results of a single election didn’t go the way I would prefer? Or that I take my duty to my children seriously enough to resist being bullied out of my opinion by pro-district hacks?

FWIW, the following was my comment on Ms. Goodman’s website:
_________________________

In your blog post that attracted the most comments to date, you stated:

“I am disappointed and frustrated by the disingenuousness or outright deception of those who would have Ridgewood voters believe it’s possible to simply choose, and switch to one “perfect” math program. I have spoken to dozens of teachers and administrators in Ridgewood and other districts. Every single one of them has stated that the most important factor in math success is the teachers. In an elementary school classroom, the teacher is responsible for students with a variety of skill levels, aptitudes, learning styles, attention spans, parental involvement, and interests. What that teacher does is use what he or she feels are the proper books, workbooks, worksheets, etc., to teach those particular kids. Some of the materials may be “traditional.” Some of those materials may be considered “reform.” It’s just not true that on the first day of school, a teacher opens a textbook and begins on page 1, and follows the “plan.” That’s not the way real classrooms work, and I, for one, am insulted on behalf of our teachers whenever I hear someone say that we simply need to “switch” to this or that math program. If that were true, then we would not have two schools, using basically the same program, and yet receiving wildly different results. Clearly, something other than which book is used, is influencing math success.”

I am disappointed and frustrated by this statement. You bemoan what you consider unhelpful comments. Yet the statements you rail against are not only unattributed, but also not nearly representative of the depth and breadth of local research and thought on the nature and extent of the problems with the Ridgewood district’s K-8 math program, and potential ways out of this morass. Besides local blogs and commentary, there is plenty of material out there which the BOE should be considering, both individually as trustees keen on “boning up” on important issues, as well as during public meetings, to demonstrate that our BOE is engaged and ready to be demanding of those we entrust our children to, rather than being “asleep at the switch”.

Please provide any additional comments or information available to you to demonstrate that you are no longer willing to let these problems fester, or allow subordinates to continue without without fair, but stern and hardminded, guidance from elected officials. On this issue at least, please show that you are an individual thinker and leader, and not unnecessarily married to the concept of conciliation, concensus, or group discussions. I have children who are counting on all of you.
_________________

In time, Ms. Goodman provided the following response:
_________________

Thanks for the comment. I do know that there is a lot of material out there to consider, beyond the blogs and letters to the editor. I am doing my best to learn as much as I can from all “sides” — different parents, teachers, administrators, “experts,” other districts, the math panel report, other reports. You are correct that we have not had much public discussion on the topic over the past two months. Our administration has been conducting its search for a “partner,” as it was charged to do. I would like to assure you that I am not willing to let the issue “fester,” nor will I withhold my guidance as an elected official charged with seeing that our schools are well run. I plan to ask my questions (and ask your questions, if you have any) when our new superintendent begins over the summer. That seems to make the most sense. I’m not sure there’s much else I can tell you right now to show that I am an individual thinker — but I must caution you that I am one who believes in the concepts of consensus and group discussion. If you are hoping for a “my way or the highway” approach, that’s not going to happen, at least from me, on a subject like this.
___________________

My follow-up was as follows:
___________________

Here’s a question you might consider posing to Dr. Fishbein:

The Presidential Math Panel has recently emphasized math facts automaticity and subject matter mastery as two critical goals for America’s K-8 math instructional programs, and has singled out the wide-spiraling approach employed by Everyday Math (Willard/Somerville) and like curricula, such as TERC/Investigations (Orchard/Travell) as being particularly incompatible with such goals. In light of these developments, why would the Ridgewood district want to consider standardizing on either of these curricula as the primary means for the transmission of essential math content to our grade school students?
________________

If Dr. Fishbein’s response is as tepid as Ms. Goodman’s handling of this issue so far has been non-committal, I don’t hold out much hope for positive progress in the near term.

So according to 7:29, the answer is simple. I should simply ‘quit’.

Wayside Gardens
So according to 7:29, the answer is simple. I should simply ‘quit’.

Radio amateurs test their mettle

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2008 at 5:15 pm

Radio amateurs test their mettle
Sunday, June 29, 2008
BY STEPHANIE AKIN
STAFF WRITER
If you turn on the radio today, you probably won’t hear the thousands of amateur broadcasters exchanging simulated emergency signals thoughout the country.

But the frequencies have been buzzing since early Saturday afternoon.

Amateur broadcasters at five stations in North Jersey are participating in the 24-hour, nationwide display of their emergency broadcasting skills. During the event, called a field day, they will send signals from mountaintops and parking lots, using microphones and Morse code, broadcasting on frequencies usually too high or low to register on the commercial radio dial.

“This is really a drill,” said Joel Wagoner, a member of the Ramapo Mountain Amateur Radio Club. “It’s to test our ability to set up a station at any time and under any conditions.”

Wagoner spoke as his fellow club members set up a makeshift station in a clearing off Skyline Drive in Ringwood.

As they wiped sweat from their faces and swatted at flies, the group of mostly middle-aged men put together a showcase of modern radio technology.

Club members, among them a high school teacher, an accountant and a retired electrical engineer, hung antennas from the trees that could send signals as far as California. They wired high-frequency portable radios to microphones. They installed Morse code transmitters in a tent. All the equipment was powered by an emergency generator, so club members could practice working without electricity.

Club member Michael Mutascio of Ringwood created a command center in a trailer he usually uses to store his snowmobile. Inside, he sat at a desk with two laptop computers, a desktop connected to an early version of a police emergency tracking system, and – of course – several radios.

The club’s radios can send messages to the other side of the country, bounce signals off meteor showers and even use the moon as a reflector, he said.

“Those space sounds you’re hearing is actually text being sent to a computer server,” he said as one of the computers emitted an eerie series of blips. “The sounds are converted into text.”

For this event, though, the goal is to exchange as many signals as possible with other broadcasters operating from similar stations.

Clubs that contact the most stations win an award. But club members said completing the exercise is more important than winning the contest.

Amateur radio operators help communicate with the outside world during disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, when cellphone and Internet service are severed.

Because operators can’t predict which equipment or technologies will be available when they need them, it’s important to practice transmitting signals on several frequencies and with a range of equipment.

“Even though there is a lot of technology out there, we prepare for failure,” said Mutascio, who is a paramedic by profession and volunteers in international disaster response.

In an actual disaster, amateur radio operators can broadcast from their homes, from parking lots or from several emergency broadcast systems in the region.

The mountaintop site allows the club to send its signals farther. It also allows operators to simulate some of the stresses they might encounter in a real emergency, such as working for long hours with little sleep. Several club members planned to camp on the mountain, but only after they were too exhausted to send signals.

“This keeps me better-rounded in case something goes wrong,” Mutascio said.

E-mail: akin@northjersey.com

Arrival

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2008 at 1:56 am

Microsoft - Windows Marketplace

Sovereign Bank Hires Vincent A. Ricciardi to Lead Retail Banking for Metro New York/New Jersey Division

In Uncategorized on June 29, 2008 at 12:10 am

NEW YORK, June 27 — Sovereign Bank announced today that it has hired Vincent A. Ricciardi as Senior Market Executive overseeing Sovereign’s retail banking activities in the Metro New York/New Jersey markets and districts.

Ricciardi, of Ridgewood, N.J., has more than 32 years of banking and retail experience. Prior to joining Sovereign, he was Senior Vice President and Region Executive for Premier Banking and Investments at Bank of America. In this position, he managed more than 400 employees in New York City, Long Island, Westchester, upstate New York, New Jersey and southwest Connecticut. Prior to that role, he was a Bank of America Market Executive in New Jersey, overseeing 11 districts and 152 branches.

“As a native of the Metro New York/New Jersey area, Vince truly understands the challenges and opportunities that we have in these valuable markets,” noted Roy Lever, Sovereign Executive Vice President and Managing Director of Retail Banking. “I am confident that under Vince’s leadership, the entire team in this division will achieve great success.”

Ricciardi earned a master’s degree from New York University and a bachelor’s degree from St. Peter’s College, Jersey City, N.J. He also pursued post graduate studies at New York University.

About Sovereign

Sovereign Bancorp, Inc., (“Sovereign”) , is the parent company of Sovereign Bank, a financial institution with principal markets in the Northeastern United States. Sovereign Bank has 750 community banking offices, over 2,300 ATMs and approximately 12,000 team members. Sovereign offers a broad array of financial services and products including retail banking, business and corporate banking, cash management, capital markets, wealth management and insurance. For more information on Sovereign Bank, visit http://www.sovereignbank.com or call 1-877-SOV-BANK.

Sovereign Bank is a registered trademark of Sovereign Bank or its affiliates or subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.

CONTACT: Ellen Molle, +1-617-757-5573, cell +1-617-548-9932,
emolle@sovereignbank.com; or Mike Armstrong, +1-347-563-9251, or cell:
+1-917-279-8437, marmstro@sovereignbank.com, both of Sovereign Bank

Web site: http://www.sovereignbank.com/

J&R Computer/Music World

Come celebrate Independence Day in Ridgewood

In Uncategorized on June 27, 2008 at 1:20 pm


Ridgewood Fourth of July Celebration Information

Come celebrate Independence Day in Ridgewood – Friday, July 4th! TICKETS FOR FIREWORKS: Pre-event $5 (at Gate $10 adults/$5 children) NOW on sale in Ridgewood at Alice, Alice, Alice; Artventure; Backyard Living; Citizens Community Bank; Daily Treat Restaurant; Goffle Brook Farm; Harding Wine and Spirits; Hillmann Electric; Hoskins Propane; Irish Eyes Imports; Ridgewood Cycle Shop; The Wine Seller and Town & Country Apothecary & Fine Cosmetics. JUNE 27 – JULY 3 at Ridgewood Library

SCHEDULE DETAILS: www.ridgewoodjuly4th.org2008 Celebration Theme ChosenLet’s Make it a Safe CelebrationTicket Sales Information

1-800-PetMeds

***It’s Not Too Late to Volunteer for the 4th of July Parade!

In Uncategorized on June 27, 2008 at 1:15 pm

The Ridgewood Fourth of July Celebration needs small teams of 2-4 volunteers each to carry Sponsor Banners in the Parade. A great opportunity for a family or group of young people to participate and help to “Support the Tradition” of celebrating Independence Day in Ridgewood.

email: ridgewood4th@gmail.com

phone: 201-602-1922

3balls Golf